Under the Lid with #BrainAwarenessWeek

For #BrainAwarenessWeek, we go to Georg Bartisch, 16th century surgeon and inventor, and his  Ophthamoduleia (”eye-service”), published in 1583. But in looking so closely at disorders of the eye, Bartisch necessarily became incredibly interested in the brain. The incredible wood cut prints show the delicate internal parts through the use of book-flaps. Layers of paper could be lifted away to reveal more detailed anatomy!

Many books contained such flaps, including the work of Vesalius, often considered the father of anatomy. (An excellent point about flap books may be found here, from the Bodleian). Bartisch performed surgeries on the eyes, and even advised his students on how best to hold patients down for the procedure. (Eye surgery would continue to be a horribly painful affair until 1884, when Austrian ophthalmologist Carl Koller realized that a few drops of topical cocaine solution rendered the eye immobile and numb).

While Bartisch does not focus on brain surgery, he nevertheless saw anatomy of the brain cavity as crucial for understanding disorders of sigh. One of the more interesting features of Bartisch’ text involves the beautifully rendered brain flaps. They could be colorized for greater effect, but the Dittrick’s copy appears as they might have hot of the block press. Stunning detail, rendered plain through innovative “paper” anatomy, Bartisch provided a glimpse “under the lid.”

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

REF:

Bartisch, George. Ophthalmodouleia, das ist, Augendienst. Newer und wolgegründter Bericht von Ursachen und Erkentnüs aller Gebrechen, Schäden und Mängel der Augen und des Gesichtes. [Dreszden, Matthes Stöckel] 1583